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Solutions to Sawing Problems through Band Evaluation

Below is a list of common problems encountered during typical sawing operations. Click on a problem to reveal it's potential cause. If you would like to discuss any of these in more detail, feel free to contact us using the live chat, or by calling 888.527.5548

Probable Causes that should always be considered:

  • Improper break‑in procedure.
  • Excessive band speed for the type of material being cut. This generates a high tooth tip temperature resulting in accelerated tooth wear.
  • Low feed rate causes teeth to rub instead of penetrate. This is most common on work hardenable materials such as stainless and tool steels.
  • Insufficient cutting fluid due to inadequate supply, improper ratio, and / or improper application
  • Improper blade selection for application.
  • Excessive feeding rate or feed pressure.
  • Worn, missing or improperly positioned chip brush.
  • Improper band tension.

Heavy even wear on tips and corners of teeth

Observation 1

Heavy even wear on tips and corners of teeth

The wear on teeth is smooth across the tips and the corners of set teeth have become rounded.

  • Improper break‑in procedure.
  • Excessive band speed for the type of material being cut. This generates a high tooth tip temperature resulting in accelerated tooth wear.
  • Low feed rate causes teeth to rub instead of penetrate. This is most common on work hardenable materials such as stainless and tool steels.
  • Hard materials being cut such as "Flame Cut Edge" or abrasive materials being cut such as "Fiber Reinforced Composites."
  • Insufficient cutting fluid due to inadequate supply, improper ratio, and / or improper application
Observation 1

Wear on both sides of teeth

Observation 2

Wear on both sides of teeth

The side of teeth on both sides of band have heavy wear markings.

  • Broken, worn or missing back‑up guides allowing teeth to contact side guides
  • Improper side guides for band width.
  • Backing the band out of an incomplete cut.
Observation 2

Wear on one side of teeth

Observation 3

Wear on one side of teeth

Only one side of the teeth has heavy wear markings.

  • Worn wheel flange, allowing side of teeth to contact wheel surface or improper tracking on flange-less wheel.
  • Loose or improperly positioned side guides.
  • Blade not perpendicular to cut.
  • Blade rubbing against cut surface on return stroke of machine head.
  • The teeth rubbing against a part of machine such as chip brush assembly, guards, etc.
Observation 3

Chipped or broken teeth

Observation 4

Chipped or broken teeth

A scattered type of tooth breakage on tips and corners of the teeth.

  • Improper break‑in procedure.
  • Improper blade selection for application.
  • Handling damage due to improper opening of folded band.
  • Improper positioning or clamping of material. (Bars that have spun)
  • Excessive feeding rate or feed pressure.
  • Hitting hard spots or hard scale in material.
Observation 4

Discolored tips of teeth due to excessive frictional heat

Observation 5

Discolored tips of teeth due to excessive frictional heat

The tooth tips show a discolored surface from generating an excessive amount of frictional heat during use.

  • Insufficient cutting fluid due to inadequate supply, improper ratio and/or improper application.
  • Excessive band speed.
  • Improper feeding rate.
  • Band installed backwards.
Observation 5

Tooth strippage

Observation 6

Tooth strippage

Section or sections of teeth which broke from the band backing.

  • Improper or lack of break‑in procedure.
  • Worn, missing or improperly positioned chip brush.
  • Excessive feeding rate or feed pressure.
  • Movement or vibration of material being cut.
  • Improper tooth pitch for cross sectional size of material being cut.
  • Improper positioning of material being cut.
  • Insufficient cutting fluid due to inadequate supply, improper ratio and/or improper application.
  • Hard spots in material being cut.
  • Band speed too slow for grade of material being cut.
Observation 6

Chips welded to tooth tips

Observation 7

Chips welded to tooth tips

High temperature or pressure generated during the cut bonding the chips to the tip and face of teeth.

  • Insufficient cutting fluid due to inadequate supply, improper ratio and/or improper application.
  • Worn, missing or improperly positioned chip brush.
  • Improper band speed.
  • Improper feeding rate.
Observation 7

Gullets loading up with material

Observation 8

Gullets loading up with material

High temperature or pressure generated during the cut bonding the chips to the tip and face of teeth.

  • Too fine of a tooth pitch ‑ insufficient gullet capacity.
  • Excessive feeding rate producing too large of a chip.
  • Worn, missing or improperly positioned chip brush.
  • Insufficient cutting fluid due to inadequate supply, improper ratio and/or improper application.
Observation 8

Heavy wear on both sides of band

Observation 9

Heavy wear on both sides of band

Both sides of band have heavy wear patterns.

  • Chipped or broken side guides.
  • Side guide adjustment may be too tight.
  • Insufficient cutting fluid due to inadequate supply, improper ratio and/or improper application.
Observation 9

Uneven wear or scoring on the sides of the band

Observation 10

Uneven wear or scoring on the sides of the band

Wear patterns are near gullet area on one side and near back edge on opposite side.

  • Loose side guides
  • Chipped, worn or defective side guides.
  • Band is rubbing on part of the machine.
  • Guide arms spread to maximum capacity.
  • Accumulation of chips in side guides.
Observation 10

Body breakage or crack from gullets

Observation 11

Body breakage or crack from gullets

Body break from gullet. Gullet crack. The origin of the fracture is indicated by a flat area on the fracture surface.

  • Excessive back‑up guide "pre-load". (see Observation 12)
  • Improper band tension.
  • Guide arms spread to maximum capacity.
  • Improper beam bar alignment.
  • Side guide adjustment is too tight.
  • Excessively worn teeth.
Observation 11

Body breakage ‑ fracture traveling in an angular direction

Observation 12

Body breakage ‑ fracture traveling in an angular direction

The fracture originates in the gullet and immediately travels in an angular direction into the backing of band.

  • An excessive twist type of stress existed.
  • Guide arms spread to capacity causing excessive twist from band wheel to guides.
  • Guide arms spread too wide while cutting small cross sections.
  • Excessive back-up guide "pre-load".
Observation 12

Body breakage or cracks from back edge

Observation 13

Body breakage or cracks from back edge

The fracture originates from the back edge of band. The origin of the fracture is indicated by a flat area on the fracture surface.

  • Excessive back-up guide "pre-load" will cause back edge to work harden which results in cracking.
  • Excessive feeding rate.
  • Improper band tracking ‑ back edge rubbing heavy on wheel flange.
  • Worn or defective back‑up guides.
  • Improper band tension.
  • Notches in back edge from handling damage.
Observation 13

Heavy wear and/or swaging on back edge

Observation 14

Heavy wear and/or swaging on back edge

Heavy back edge wear will have a polished appearance or abnormal grooves worn into surface. Swaging of corners can also occur.

  • Excessive feeding rate.
  • Excessive back‑up guide "pre-load".
  • Improper band tracking ‑ back edge rubbing heavy on wheel flange.
  • Worn or defective back‑up guides.
Observation 14

Butt weld breakage

Observation 15

Butt weld breakage

To determine if the band broke at the weld, inspect the sides at the fracture to see if there are grind markings from the weld finishing process.

  • Any of the factors that cause body breaks can also cause butt weld breaks.
  • (See Observations 11, 12 and 13).
Observation 15

Used band is "long" on the tooth edge

Observation 16

Used band is "long" on the tooth edge

"Long" on tooth edge is a term used to describe the straightness of the band. The teeth are on the outside of the arc when the strip is Iying on a flat surface.

  • Side guides are too tight ‑ rubbing near gullets.
  • Excessive "pre-load" ‑ band riding heavily against back-up guides.
  • Worn band wheels causing uneven tension.
  • Excessive feeding rate.
  • Guide arms are spread to maximum capacity.
  • Improper band tracking ‑ back edge rubbing heavy on wheel flange.
Observation 16

Used band is "short" on tooth edge

Observation 17

Used band is "short" on tooth edge

"Short" on the tooth edge is a term used to describe the straightness of the band. The teeth are on the inside of the arc when the strip is Iying on a flat surface.

  • Side guides are too tight - rubbing near back edge.
  • Worn band wheels causing uneven tension.
  • Guide arms spread too far apart.
  • Excessive feeding rate.
Observation 17

Band is twisted into a figure "8" configuration

Observation 18

Band is twisted into a figure "8" configuration

The band does not retain its normal shape while holding the sides of loop together. This indicates the flatness has been altered during use.

  • Excessive band tension.
  • Any of the conditions which cause the band to be long (#16) or short (#17) on tooth edge.
  • Cutting a tight radius.
Observation 18

Broken band shows a twist in band length

Observation 19

Broken band shows a twist in band length

When a broken band Lying on a flat surface displays a twist from one end to the other, this indicates the band flatness has been altered during use.

  • Excessive band tension.
  • Any of the conditions which cause the band to be long (#16) or short (#17) on tooth edge.
  • Cutting a tight radius.
Observation 19

Heavy wear in only the smallest gullets

Observation 20

Heavy wear in only the smallest gullets

Heavy wear in only the smallest gullets is an indication that there is a lack of gullet capacity for the chips being produced.

  • Improper break‑in procedure.
  • Excessive band speed for the type of material being cut. This generates a high tooth tip temperature resulting in accelerated tooth wear.
  • Low feed rate causes teeth to rub instead of penetrate. This is most common on work hardenable materials such as stainless and tool steels.
  • Insufficient cutting fluid due to inadequate supply, improper ratio, and / or improper application
  • Improper blade selection for application.
  • Excessive feeding rate or feed pressure.
  • Worn, missing or improperly positioned chip brush.
  • Improper band tension.
Observation 20

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